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Enneagram Sins: The 7 deadly sins of Christianity + 2

Enneagram Sins

The Enneagram sins relate the seven deadly sins of Christianity to the passions of the Enneagram personality types. Because there are only 7 deadly sins but 9 personality types, the Enneagram sins are also referred to as the 7 deadly sins + 2.

The personality types find their way into the Christian world

During the 1970s, Robert Ochs learned of the Enneagram personality types from Claudio Naranjo and through his teachings the Enneagram found its way into various Christian communities. A number of pioneering teachers and authors had their introduction to the types via these communities (e.g., Don Riso, Richard Rohr, Jerome Wagner, Suzanne Zuercher, Kathleen Hurley and Theodore Donson).

The first book published on the Enneagram personality types came from this lineage as well in 1984, The Enneagram: A Journey of Self-Discovery by Maria Beesing, Robert J. Nogosek, and Patrick H. O'Leary

The 7 deadly sins + 2

Oscar Ichazo's Enneagram of Passions are sometimes correlated to the 7 deadly sins of Christianity (also called the 7 capital or cardinal sins).

  • Type 1: Anger or Wrath
  • Type 2: Pride
  • Type 4: Envy
  • Type 5: Avarice or Greed
  • Type 7: Gluttony
  • Type 8: Excess or Lust
  • Type 9: Laziness or Sloth

The +2 is added to account for all nine Enneagram types.

  • Type 3: Deceit
  • Type 6: Fear

While the words used for the sins closely match the labels used with the Enneagram passions, the meanings can be quite different

As the Enneagram personality types became more popular and mainstream, the 7 deadly sins + 2 mostly fell out of favor but is still used today in some Christian circles.


Quick Guide to the Enneagram

This page is part of the Quick Guide to the Enneagram available on this website. For more information about any particular Enneagram type or the many concepts and history of the Enneagram types visit the Quick Guide main page.

The Nine Enneagram Types x
The Nine Enneagram Types