Additional Enneagram Concepts

The Enneagram Symbol with Arrows‚Äč

Below are brief descriptions of many of the concepts used with the Enneagram types in addition to the types and variations. The nine types, wings, instincts, and Tritype have already been described in previous pages of this Quick Guide.

7 Deadly Sins + 2

Used at one time to describe the Enneagram personality types where passions were equated to the seven deadly sins of Christianity: 1-anger or wrath, 2-pride, 4-envy, 5-avarice or greed, 7-gluttony, 8-lust, and 9-sloth. The +2 referred to two labels added for types 3 and 6: 3-deceit and 6-fear.

Aggressive Types

Karen Horney's aggressive type moves against people. Although Karen Horney's work predates the Enneagram personality types, Enneagram types 3, 7, and 8 (aggressive types) have been associated with her aggressive type.

Centers of Intelligence

The Enneagram personality types reference three types of intelligence (body-based, heart-based, and head-based). The nine types are arranged on the Enneagram symbol by which center they're most preoccupied with: types 8, 9, and 1 are in the body-based or gut center; types 2, 3, and 4 are in the heart-based center; types 5, 6, and 7 are in the head-based center.

Compliant Types

Karen Horney's compliant type moves toward people. Although Karen Horney's work predates the Enneagram personality types, Enneagram types 6, 1, and 2 have been associated with her compliant type.

Connecting Points

Each of the Enneagram personality types are connected to two other types or points by the inner lines of the symbol. Each type is said to be influenced by its two connecting points.

Core Focus

A new way of describing the Enneagram personality types where the types don't describe personality directly but describe a type of focus at the core of personality which strongly influences an individual's personality and approach to life. The core focus is introduced and described in the Enneagram User Guide series of books.

Direction of Integration/Disintegration

Each of the Enneagram personality types are connected to two other types or points by the inner lines of the symbol. The arrows that are sometimes placed on the lines indicate a movement from one type to another. Movement in the direction of the arrow is the direction of disintegration, while movement in the opposite direction is the direction of disintegration. This concept was developed by Don Riso and is primarily used by the Enneagram Institute school.

Enneatypes

The term enneatypes was coined by Claudio Naranjo to describe the personality types of the Enneagram. Naranjo evolved Oscar Ichazo's original work with the Enneagram types into the personality types as commonly used today.

Ego-Types

Oscar Ichazo's Enneagrams of Fixations, Holy Ideas, Traps, Passions, and Virtues from which much of today's personality types evolved were concerned with finding freedom from ego fixation. The five Enneagrams can collectively be used to describe the Enneagram types in terms of Ego-Types.

Fixation

Each Enneagram type has a specific fixation that is central to that type: 1-resentment, 2-flattery, 3-vanity, 4-melancholy, 5-stinginess, 6-cowardice, 7-planning, 8-vengeance, and 9-indolence. These fixations come from Oscar Ichazo's Enneagram of Fixations, one of the Enneagrams from which the personality types evolved. The fixation is remedied by the holy idea.

Holy Idea

Each Enneagram type has a specific holy idea that remedies the fixation: 1-holy perfection, 2-holy will, 3-holy harmony, 4-holy origin, 5-holy omniscience, 6-holy strength, 7-holy wisdom, 8-holy truth, and 9-holy love. These holy ideas come from Oscar Ichazo's Enneagram of Holy Ideas, one of the Enneagrams from which the personality types evolved.

Hornevian Triads

The three sets or triads of Enneagram personality types that have come to be associated with Karen Horney's aggressive, compliant, and detached types. Types 9, 4, and 5 are generally described as withdrawn (detached) types. Types 3, 7, and 8 are generally described as aggressive types. Types 6, 1, and 2 are generally described as compliant types.

Law of Seven

Represented by the hexad of the Enneagram symbol connecting points 1, 4, 2, 8, 5, and 7. It represents the idea of the octave. It's part of the teaching of G.I. Gurdjieff who introduced the Enneagram symbol to the world. Gurdjieff didn't use the symbol for personality types, but some people still attempt to apply the law of seven to the types.

Law of Three

Represented by the triangle of the Enneagram symbol connecting points 9, 3, and 6. The three elements are often referred to as affirming/denying/reconciling or active/passive/neutral. It's part of the teaching of G.I. Gurdjieff who introduced the Enneagram symbol to the world. Gurdjieff didn't use the symbol for personality types, but some people still attempt to apply the law of three to the types.

Levels of Development

Each of the nine Enneagram personality types can be looked at through nine levels of health or development (most healthy at level 1 to least healthy at level 9). Each individual operates at several levels at any point in their life. The goal is to move to the healthier levels. This concept was developed by Don Riso and is exclusively used by the Enneagram Institute school.

Passion

Each Enneagram type has a specific passion that is central to that type: 1-anger, 2-pride, 3-deceit, 4-envy, 5-avarice, 6-fear, 7-gluttony, 8-excess, and 9-laziness. The passions come from Oscar Ichazo's Enneagram of Passions, one of the Enneagrams from which the personality types evolved. The passion appears when the virtue is lacking.

Stress/Security Point

Each of the Enneagram personality types are connected to two other types or points by the inner lines of the symbol. The arrows that are sometimes placed on the lines indicate a movement from one type to another. Movement from one type to another against the arrow is toward the security point. Movement from one type to another with the arrow is toward the stress point. This concept is used by several different Enneagram schools.

Trap

Each Enneagram type has a specific trap that it falls into: 1-perfection, 2-freedom, 3-efficiency, 4-authenticity, 5-observer, 6-security, 7-idealism, 8-justice, and 9-seeker. The traps come from Oscar Ichazo's Enneagram of Traps, one of the Enneagrams from which the personality types evolved. While the holy idea is the true remedy for the fixation, the trap is the false remedy.

Triad

The nine Enneagram personality types are sometimes grouped into three sets of triads. One triad contains three types. A set of triads consists of three triads that together contain all nine types with each type in only one triad.

Trifix

Used by Oscar Ichazo with his earlier Enneagram types to pinpoint and work with ego fixation. An individual identified three types or fixations, one from each of the three center. Tritype is a similar concept used with the Enneagram personality types of today.

Virtue

Each Enneagram type has a specific virtue that is needed to counter the passion: 1-serenity, 2-humility, 3-truthfulness, 4-equanimity, 5-detachment, 6-courage, 7-sobriety, 8-innocence, and 9-action. The virtues come from Oscar Ichazo's Enneagram of Virtues, one of the Enneagrams from which the personality types evolved. The passion appears when the virtue is lacking.

Withdrawn Types

Karen Horney's detached type moves away from people. Although Karen Horney's work predates the Enneagram personality types, Enneagram types 9, 4, and 5 (withdrawn types) have been associated with her detached type.